David Attenborough: 'The collapse of our civilizations is on the horizon'

David Attenborough: 'The collapse of our civilizations is on the horizon'

Fiji's prime minister, Frank Bainimarama, who presided over last year's United Nations climate summit, said the "just transition" proposal should not just consider the fate of fossil-fuel workers but all people around the world whose lives were affected by climate change.

"The world's people have spoken, their message is clear, time is running out", he explained. "Time is running out", Attenborough said. "It's what I think you could call a distributed leadership, where you have a number of countries - some of them small or medium-sized - really making headway and doing it in tandem with cities and states and businesses".

Climate Action Minister Richard Bruton, who is in Poland for the talks, said he fully endorsed UN Secretary-General António Guterres's comments about the need to take action. "The continuation of our civilisations and the natural world on which we depend is in your hands".

The 24th Conference of Parties - or COP24 - is a pivotal moment in the global effort to combat climate change.

At a similar summit three years ago, the Paris Agreement was drafted and signed, aiming to limit man-made global warming to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

"Success at COP24 means finalizing the Paris Agreement Work Programme - period". It was dwarfed by marches in Brussels, Berlin and Cologne over the weekend calling for greater action to curb climate change.

German Ambassador in Dhaka Peter Fahrenholtz stressed that the negative effects of climate change becoming perceptible for more and more people worldwide must immediately be taken seriously and must urgently be fought on a global level.

"We are trying to save the world from annihilation, but we must do this in a way that those who live with us today in the world have the best possible living conditions", Polish President Andrzej Duda said.

Four former leaders of United Nations talks, including Laurent Fabius of France, who led negotiations for the Paris agreement, issued a statement urging immediate action.

The statement pointed out that the warnings contained in the recent IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C as well as the UNEP Emissions Gap Report 2018 were just the latest examples of this.

To ease some of those worries, the World Bank on Monday announced $200 billion (175 billion euros) in climate action investment for 2021-25 - a major shot in the arm for green initiatives but one which needs bolstering by state-provided funding.

To reach this goal, emissions must be halved from 2010 levels by 2030, Guterres said.

"In short, we need a complete transformation of our global energy economy, as well as how we manage land and forest resources", said Guterres.

At the framework of a Talanoa Dialogue, the six panelists, including Bangladesh Environmental Lawyers Association (BELA) Chief Executive Chief Executive Syeda Rizwana Hasan, Dr Nahid Rezwana of Dhaka University, Dr Sultan Ahmed of Ministry of Environment and Forests, as well as almost 40 invitees were given a voice to share their stories, ambitions and engagements regarding climate change.

The British environmental website Carbon Brief attributed Attenborough's change in perspective to a lecture by American scientist Ralph Cicerone in 2004, in which Cicerone showed graphs of world temperature, global population and the make-up of the atmosphere.

But many other countries are already dealing with the droughts, higher seas and catastrophic storms climate change is exacerbating right now.

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