Brexit: Theresa May warns rejecting deal would be 'catastrophic'

Brexit: Theresa May warns rejecting deal would be 'catastrophic'

British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Sunday that a failure to support her Brexit deal will be catastrophic for Britain.

Asked whether MPs could bring forward legislation to revoke Article 50, Cable told BBC TV: "Yes that is exactly what will happen and that is exactly what we should be doing because it would be absolutely outrageous and unforgivable if the chaotic circumstances of a no deal were allowed to happen". The pair surged during London trading hours after Conservative rebel Dominic Grieve urged UK PM Theresa May to delay Brexit if her deal is rejected, and while Downing Street later stated that there won't be an extension of Art. 50, the currency held on to gains.

The Observer newspaper reported that military planners had been sent into several government departments to help with preparations for a no deal Brexit.

"It couldn't be simpler and I have to say, I did think on that day, 'That's it".

He said: "We will keep the £39bn and spend it as we see fit".

"I would love a general election because that would allow us to give a very clear statement to the Tory government as to where we're standing", he said.

He warned Eurosceptics that they may not be able to rely on the clock ticking down to the default option of a no-deal Brexit on March 29 if Mrs May's deal is voted down.

"So those on the Brexiteer side seeking ideological purity with a deal are risking Brexit, because there is a growing risk that events could unfold in ways that (mean) they are leaving the door ajar to ways that increase the risk to Brexit".

"If the UK is a genuine partnership of nations it is essential that the views of the people of Scotland, the Scottish Parliament and Scottish Government are taken seriously, and not ignored, when the vote on the UK Government's deal takes place on Tuesday".

Mrs May was boosted on Thursday by two Tory backbenchers - her former policy adviser George Freeman, and Trudy Harrison - indicating they will back her deal, as well as by a call from Japanese PM Shinzo Abe for the United Kingdom to avoid no-deal.

A group of British lawmakers, including some former Tory ministers, are working on a way to allow non-government members to take control of the timetable and bring legislation forward that would make it illegal to leave the European Union without a deal, if May loses the vote, according to the Sunday Times.

Ian Blackford said MPs must take control of the Brexit process and ensure a no-deal outcome is avoided.

But officials said Brussels would be in listening mode, and take guidance from the prime minister as to the next steps should she suffer a heavy defeat as is widely expected.

Ms Rudd said it was "right" for the government to make preparations for a no-deal Brexit, comparing it to wearing a seatbelt when driving a fast auto.

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