Hong Kong threatens to boil over as protesters defiantly egg police station

Hong Kong threatens to boil over as protesters defiantly egg police station

She said she was anxious about escalating violence, but added that "the protesters were just trying to protect themselves against police violence". Hong Kong's future is theirs.

On Saturday, police fired volleys of teargas to disperse protesters after activists rallied across the city.

For their part, protesters say police have used excessive force and ignored calls for help when thugs attacked civilians in a commuter rail station.

Tear gas was sacked at a crowd of some 1,000 people in a brief evening standoff at a commuter rail station in Tai Wai in the northern region of New Territories.

Tear gas was also fired at an exit of Tai Koo station, the South China Morning Post reported. Many shops in the area were shuttered. Many wore face masks to shield their identities, and a few had helmets.

A State Department official told AFP representatives of the USA government "meet regularly with a wide cross section of people across Hong Kong and Macau". The website tweeted a video of one of the protesters bleeding from a head injury. Officials said the protest has not disrupted the airport's operations.

The city's pro-democracy protest movement began in June against an extradition bill that would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China to stand trial.

Some 10 weeks after protests first began over a since-suspended extradition bill, Hong Kong continues to be a city in turmoil. They have also demanded investigations into the actions of the police during the demonstrations.

In a separate memo on Saturday, Cathay Pacific CEO Rupert Hogg told staff that in order to comply with the new regulatory demands it would not allow any crew supporting protests in Hong Kong to staff flights to the mainland from midnight on August 10.

Activists calling for greater democratic freedoms in the city have shown no sign of standing down, despite Hong Kong's leader insisting she will not meet their demands. But in recent years, some have accused the Communist Party-ruled central government of steadily chipping away at their freedoms. She said she was anxious about escalating violence, but added that "the protesters were just trying to protect themselves against police violence".

Hong Kong's government says the protests are pushing the city to an extremely unsafe edge.

Leung Chun-ying, vice-chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, also expressed his support for the Civil Aviation Administration's decision, on his social media account. Both marches and the airport protests were peaceful.

Ting Wai Fong, a retiree, said she was determined to keep coming to protests and march through the city to support the young generation.

Authorities have not given permission for Sunday's two protests planned in Sham Shui Po or North Point, but the rally at Victoria Park was permitted. The men, some carrying Chinese flags, surrounded journalists in neon press vests and yelled at them. Late on Saturday they flashed laser pointers at riot police and lifted bricks and scavenged building materials to barricade roads in Kowloon.

They first gathered in the Tai Po area, despite police denying their request for a march permit there, and quickly faced off against officers dressed in riot gear.

"They hope to use those charges to serve as a warning, but so far the protesters have not been cowed", Lam said.

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