Former Bolivian leader Evo Morales ready to stand aside in new elections

Former Bolivian leader Evo Morales ready to stand aside in new elections

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales said in an interview with Reuters in Mexico City on Friday that the United States had offered a plane to get him out of Bolivia.

Anez also has said Morales would not be allowed to participate in new presidential elections, which are supposed to be held within three months.

First indigenous president of Bolivia, Morales He had faced increasing pressure after claiming he was the absolute victor of the vote in Bolivia on October 20, with opposition supporters who took to the streets for weeks accusing him of undermining the country's democracy.

Morales resigned under pressure from Bolivia's police and military last Sunday after evidence of vote rigging tainted his October 20 election victory.

"I'm used to being with the people as a union leader, president, doing work", said Morales, who has accused his opponents of conspiring against his government.

Therefore, now that the anti-colonial president of Bolivia has stepped down due to military threats and the recent protests in the country, the West is praising these events to befool other countries, especially Venezuela, and show them the way.

Morales, who sought asylum in Mexico, tweeted describing the occasions as a "bloodbath", and referred to as Anez a dictator.

Families of the victims held a candlelight vigil late Friday in Sacaba. It contains a mixture of citizens from Spanish descent, and as well as a large population of indigenous people, who make up two-thirds of its citizens.

"We express our alarm and concern over the result of an attempt to stop a demonstration by coca leaf growers from entering the city of Cochabamba", it said, adding that it had counted 13 earlier deaths since the protests began. "Killing us like nothing?"

The violence in Bolivia adds to growing unrest in the region, including in neighbour Chile, where protests over social inequalities boiled over into riots that left at least 20 dead.

The Inter-American Fee on Human Rights condemned what it referred to as a disproportionate use of power towards the protesters. Anez said she was pleased to establish relations with a "democratic Venezuela". "There's political persecution against our leaders".

Morales resigned under pressure from Bolivia's police and military last Sunday after evidence of vote rigging tainted his October 20 election victory.

But Jerjes Justiniano, minister of the presidency for the caretaker government in La Paz, denied that the new decree was a "license to kill", reported the Bolivian daily El Deber. "There's division in Bolivia".

The vote gave him an outright win but was tarnished by allegations of fraud, sparking widespread anti-government protests that often turned violent.

"If we are asked to send one and if the conditions are right, definitely we will do our best to send an Electoral Observation Mission", she said at the press conference following the Foreign Affairs Council. The country's Constitutional Court backed her claim and said that she could take the place without confirmation by Congress, a body controlled by Morales's Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) party.

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