Supreme Court justices reject appeal over bump stock ban

Supreme Court justices reject appeal over bump stock ban

The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal by gun-rights advocates and left intact a new federal ban on bump stocks, the attachments that can make a semiautomatic rifle fire like a machine gun.

The ban, which entered into impact in March 2019, was accepted by Trump adhering to a bloodbath that eliminated 58 individuals at a songs celebration in Las Vegas in which the shooter made use of bump stocks.

However, Justice Neil Gorsuch issued a separate statement where he agreed with the court's decision to deny the appeal but criticized the lower court's deference to the Bureau's interpretation of the statutes. "The court's denial here suggests that the justices are willing to let lower court litigation over the controversial Trump administration rule run its course before deciding if - and how - to intervene", said Steve Vladeck, CNN Supreme Court analyst and professor at the University of Texas School of Law. Chevron deference requires courts to defer to agencies on the meaning of ambiguous laws if the regulators' interpretation is reasonable.

Bump stocks, which allow a shooter to fire continuously with a single pull of the trigger, figured prominently in the 2017 mass shooting at an outdoor concert in Las Vegas that killed 58 people and wounded 500 others - the deadliest shooting in modern US history.

Anti-abortion demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday
Anti-abortion demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Wednesday

Gorsuch and Justice Clarence Thomas said at the time that they would have voted to put the rule on hold as it applies to the challengers. The administration, which typically supports gun rights, argued the court should not take up the case.

The justices did not comment in declining to review a lower court-ruling that upheld the ban, which took effect almost a year ago.

The court struck down an nearly identical Texas law four years ago, but since then the court has become more conservative, especially with the retirement in 2018 of swing voter Justice Anthony Kennedy, who often sided with liberal justices on abortion rights. Some guns can fire over 400 rounds per minute with a bump stock. "Now it says the opposite".

Chevron, he added, "has no role to play when liberty is at stake", citing the criminal penalty associated with owning a bump stock.

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