Harvard study explains how COVID-19 causes loss of smell

Harvard study explains how COVID-19 causes loss of smell

As such, the impact of COVID-19 on heart health is an area in need of investigation. A new research has now revealed the reason behind this loss of smell and taste.

A team of scientists have figured out why COVID-19 patients lose their sense of smell.

Sixty percent of the participants had evidence of ongoing heart inflammation on their MRIs that was independent of preexisting conditions or the course of their COVID-19 infection, according to the researchers.

But infectious disease expert Dr. William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, who was not involved in the new study, said T cells can not be overlooked. Those are the best ways the world has for the moment when it comes to preventing getting infected with the new coronavirus. "That's what it appears could be the case". In April, the symptom was officially added to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention's list of Covid-19 symptoms.

But infectious disease expert Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine and infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville who was not involved in the new study, said that T cells cannot be overlooked.

"Here's a study that suggests that there may actually be some cross-reactivity, some pump priming if you like, with the normal conventional coronaviruses that cause colds in humans and there may be some cross-reactivity with the Covid virus that is causing so much damage. That's in and of itself intriguing because we had thought from the antibody perspective that there wasn't much cross at all", Schaffner said.

"The patients and ourselves were both surprised by the intensity and prevalence of these findings, and that they were still very pronounced even though the original illness had been by then already a few weeks away", study co-author Dr. Valentina Puntmann told UPI. "It's as though they're cousins in the same family", he said.

One of COVID-19's numerous puzzles may at long last be tackled. "And does it have any implications for vaccine development?"

The study, led by researchers from the Pennsylvania State University, University of Edinburgh, and University of Hong Kong, analyzed the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2 using available genomic data on sarbecoviruses, the viral subgenus that SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 belongs to.

The findings indicate that "the lineage giving rise to SARS-CoV-2 has been circulating unnoticed in bats for decades". The doctors had recovered nearly 11 million people infected with the new coronavirus worldwide.

The new Nature study isn't the only paper to suggest a certain level of pre-existing immunity among some people to the novel coronavirus.

"Thus, young children can potentially be important drivers of SARS-CoV-2 spread in the general population", the authors wrote.

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