Parler's website is back online

Parler's website is back online

'Now seems like the right time to remind you all - both lovers and haters - why we started this platform, ' Matze continued.

In the wake of the deadly siege at the US Capitol, President Donald Trump was accused of "incitement of insurrection" and banned from several social media platforms, including Twitter - a move condemned by many conservatives, who reportedly made a decision to boycott the company in protest. Parler has dubbed itself the "free speech social network".

The website for Parler, the social media app popular with right-wing groups, returned to the internet Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021, with a message for the company's "lovers and haters."The website for Parler, the social media app popular with right-wing groups, returned to the internet Sunday, Jan. 17, 2021, with a message for the company's "lovers and haters".

The platforms said Parler was not doing enough to prevent the spread of posts inciting violence, following unrest at the US Capitol by Trump supporters last Wednesday after weeks of violent rhetoric on online sites.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview on Fox News Sunday that Parler had been suspended and could be back in the App Store if they "get their moderation together".

Epik previously released a lengthy statement on January 11, blasting what it called a "knee jerk reaction" by the likes of Google and Amazon for 'simply deplatforming and terminating any relationship that on the surface looks problematic or controversial'. Parler, in a court filing, citing text messages between Matze and an Amazon representative, claimed Amazon was primarily concerned with whether President Donald Trump would migrate to Parler after his Twitter account was banned last week.

Parler, which has maintained that its deplatforming was meant to stamp out competition, filed an anti-trust lawsuit against Amazon last week, seeking to get its website restored.

In response, Amazon said it repeatedly warned Parler about its users' violent posts and that the company failed to promptly remove them.

There must be rules for content, Cook said. Several Parler users encouraged "bloodshed" during the D.C. riot.

Parler Chief Executive John Matze has said the company "does not condone or accept violence" on its platform.

On Friday, a new court file from Parler's legal team revealed that CEO John Matzy and his family are now in hiding due to death threats and security breaches they have faced.

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