AstraZeneca`s antibody fails in protecting exposed patients from COVID-19

AstraZeneca`s antibody fails in protecting exposed patients from COVID-19

The results of AstraZeneca's STORM CHASER trial, a Phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre trial which assessed the safety and efficacy of its long-acting antibody (LAAB) combination AZD7442, did not meet the primary endpoint of post-exposure prevention of symptomatic COVID-19 compared to a placebo.

Vials of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine and a syringe.

AZD7442 - a combination of two different monoclonal antibodies - didn't achieve a statistically significant reduction in the risk of symptomatic COVID-19 after exposure to the virus, failing the primary study objective.

The Phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre trial was conducted in 59 sites in the United Kingdom and USA with 1,121 participants.

The clinical trial involved 1,121 unvaccinated participants who had been exposed over the previous eight days to someone who tested positive with COVID-19.

Trials are continuing in order to evaluate the effect of the drug on patients before exposure to the virus and on those who have contracted it with severe symptoms.

On March 16 this year, AstraZeneca had announced an extended agreement with the USA government to supply up to 5,00,000 additional doses of AZD7442 for $205 million, contingent on AZD7442 receiving Food and Drug Administration's emergency use authorisation in post-exposure prophylaxis. The country has seen 60 cases of blood clots, including two deaths, after administering 3.3 million doses of AstraZeneca vaccine, Reuters reported.

It means Pfizer is now the preferred vaccine for those aged under 60-years-old, with the Federal Government moving to open access to the Pfizer jab for 40 to 59-year-olds immediately.

But the EMA said the body's head of vaccine strategy, Marco Cavaleri, had been misrepresented, and that he believed its benefits outweigh its risks.

The UK government on Monday announced a four-week delay to the full lifting of coronavirus restrictions in England due to a surge in infections caused by Delta, which first appeared in India.

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